STRESS MANAGEMENT

STRESS MANAGEMENT

What is Stress ?

Stress is the “Wear and Tear” our bodies experience as we adjust to our continually changing environment; it has physical and emotional effects on us and can create positive or negative feelings.
Stress is the way you react to challenges and changes around you. These changes and challenges can be either positive or negative.
Even positive changes can lead to stress?? Yes Indeed!!!

Any one of the following can create feelings of stress

✓ Change – Change in life always has an unsettling effect.
✓  Outside Threat – We may feel challenged whenever there is a seemingly external threat.
✓  Loss of Control – Whenever we experience a loss of personal control, we invite stress.

Is All Stress Bad ?

  • Stress is not always bad thing. Stress is simply the body’s response to changes that create taxing demands.
  • Mild forms of stress can act as a motivator and energizer.
  • However, if your stress level is too high, medical and social problems can result.

Positive Stress :

  • Positive stress helps you to concentrate or channel your energies to perform well.
  • Without positive stress, most people would never reach their full potential.

Negative Stress :

  • If stress is constant or the challenges you face are outside your ability or control, you may experience negative stress.
  • Negative stress can affect your health and well-being, causing many ailments, ranging from tension, headaches to heart-attacks.
  • It is therefore vital that you learn to manage your stress in order to have a happier, healthier and more productive life.

Managing Stress :

  • The first step is to become aware of the things which cause you stress and how you feel when you are stressed.
  • The second step is taking charge of yourself and the situation to the maximum extent possible.
  • Thirdly, a positive attitude to life and a healthy lifestyle are key tools in reducing negative stress.

MINDFULLNESS IS WAY OF LIFE

Mindfulness is the basic human ability to be fully present, aware of where we are and what are we doing and not overly reactive or overwhelmed by what is going on around us.

Mindfulness and Stress

Mindfulness and not only reduces stress but also gently builds an inner strength so that future stressors have less impact on our happiness and physical well-being.

How does mindfulness help us control stress levels ?

  • Become more aware of our thoughts, emotions
  • Do not immediately react
  • Be able to focus
  • Switch attitude towards stress
  • Become sensitive to the needs of your body

Attitude towards Stress :

  • Non judging, Non Striving
  • Patience, Trust
  • Acceptance
  • Letting go

We have a choice :

Is it time to press the PAUSE BUTTON ?

  • Don’t React
  • Pause and Respond
  • “Between the stimulus and response, there is a space and in that space lies our freedom and power to choose our response” – Victor Frank.
Read More
Fact vs Fiction

Fact vs Fiction

Strength-training exercises like crunches will get rid of abdominal flab.

Fact

Spot training (or reducing) isn’t possible. While crunches are important for firming and strengthening the abdominals, they won’t remove fat from that area. In addition to ab exercises, do a total-body strength workout to boost your overall lean muscle mass, and blast fat and calories with a consistent cardio routine (at least 30 minutes, three to five days a week for weight loss). Don’t forget to follow a healthy diet as well.

Myth

Sit-ups aren’t safe or effective for training your abs.

Fact

“When done in a controlled manner without the use of momentum, a sit-up is simply a trunk curl taken that much further by the use of the hip flexors, and can be a very effective ab-training exercise,” says Wayne Westcott, Ph.D., fitness research director at the South Shore YMCA in Quincy, Mass. So why the bad rap? “People with low-back pain have tight hip flexors and are advised not to do sit-ups because they work the hip flexors a good deal and might exacerbate the issue,” Westcott says. “But really, sit-ups can be done by the majority of the population.”
To safely get the most out of a full sit-up, follow instructions for the basic crunch, moving slowly in both directions, lifting up to an almost-seated position. If your neck aches, lightly cup one hand behind it for support.

Myth

If you want to get a firmer, flatter belly, you need to do ab exercises every day.

Fact

“Although the abs are postural muscles and have a predominance of slow-twitch fibres, which recover quickly from an abundance of work, they are still just like other muscles and need time to rest, recover and rebuild. Train your abs no more than two to four days a week on non-consecutive days.

Myth

You should train your abs at the end of your workout.

Fact

There’s some validity to the claim that training your abs last preserves your core strength for the earlier part of your workout: “If you’re going to do squats or multi-muscle exercises like push-ups or lunges that require a lot of balance, you might want to do abs last so your core is fresh and strong,”. On the other hand, experts generally agree that you should do ab moves when you’re most likely to do them. “The danger of always putting abs at the end is that people run out of time and end up never training them”.

Myth

Because the abs are endurance muscles, you have to do hundreds of reps to get results.

Fact

Abs do have greater endurance than most muscle groups—however, “doing an exercise with proper form, using slow, controlled motions, is an excellent way to maximize results,” says Stuart Rugg, Ph.D., chair of the department of kinesiology at Occidental College in Los Angeles. If you’re using correct form, there should be no reason to exceed two or three sets of 25 reps of any ab exercise you do. “Quality is more important than quantity

Consult a fitness professional before starting any exercise regimen.
Read More
Benefits of Flax seeds

Benefits of Flax seeds

The flax seed carries one of the biggest nutrient payloads on the planet. And while it’s not technically a grain, it has a similar vitamin and mineral profile to grains, while the amount of fibre, antioxidants, and Omega-3 fatty acids in flax leaves grains far behind in nutritive values. Additionally, flax seed is very low in carbohydrates, making it ideal for people who limit their intake of starches and sugars. And its combination of healthy fat and high fibre content make it a great food for weight loss and maintenance

Flax Seed Nutrition

Flax seed is high in most of the B vitamins, magnesium, and manganese. There are three additional nutrient groups which flax seed has in abundance, and each has many benefits.
Flax seed is Rich in Omega-3 Fatty Acids: Omega-3 fatty acids are a key force against inflammation in our bodies. Inflammation plays a part in many chronic diseases including heart disease, arthritis, asthma, diabetes, and even some cancers. This inflammation is enhanced by having too little Omega-3 intake (such as in fish, flax, and walnuts), especially in relation to Omega-6 fatty acid intake (in such oils as soy and corn oil). In the quest to equalize the ratio of these two kinds of oils, flax seed can be a real help.
Most of the oil in flax seeds is Alpha Linoleic Acid (ALA). ALA is an Omega-3 which is a precursor to the fatty acids found in salmon and other fatty cold-water fish (called EPA and DHA). Because not everyone is able to easily convert ALA into EPA and (especially) DHA, it is best not to rely solely on flax for your Omega-3 intake, but ALA also has good effects of its own, and definitely helps in the Omega 3/6 balance.
Flax Seed is High in Fibre: both soluble and insoluble. This fibre is probably mainly responsible for the cholesterol-lowering effects of flax. Fibre in the diet also helps stabilize blood sugar, and, of course, promotes proper functioning of the intestines.

Phytochemicals

Flax seed is high in phytochemicals, including many antioxidants. It is perhaps our best source of lignans, which convert in our intestines to substances which tend to balance female hormones. There is evidence that lignans may promote fertility, reduce peri-menopausal symptoms, and possibly help prevent breast cancer. In addition, lignans may help prevent Type 2 diabetes.

  • – Flax seeds need to be ground to make the nutrients available (otherwise they just “pass through”)
  • – Flax seed oil alone contains neither the fibre nor the phytochemicals of whole flax seed meal

Flax Seed Safety and Side Effects

Lot of research about the wonders of flax show little or no problems from eating it –- to the contrary, it has shown many benefits.
Big Fibre Load: Since flax has such a high fibre content, it’s best to start with a small amount and increase slowly, otherwise cramping and a “laxative effect” can result. People with irritable bowel syndrome may have an especially strong reaction to it, and should be extra-careful.
Oxidation/Rancidity: The oil in flax is highly unsaturated. This means that it is very prone to oxidation (rancidity) unless it is stored correctly. The very best way is nature’s own storage system – within the seed. Flax seeds not exposed to large amounts of heat stay safe to eat for at least a year. However, flax meal, and especially flax oil, are a different story. The meal, stored away from heat and light, will keep fresh for a few months, and the oil must be protected by refrigeration in dark containers, preferably being consumed within a few weeks of opening.

Read More
Cardio Mythbusters

Cardio Mythbusters

 

Myth:

For Weight Loss, Focus On Cardio Over Strength Training
All cardio and no strength is not only boring, but may cause you to burn fewer calories overall. “Strength training builds lean muscle mass, which both increases your metabolism and decreases fat. “So the more muscle you build, the more calories you burn on a day-to-day basis.”
Some strength-training workouts can even double as cardio: A recent study by the American Council on Exercise found that maximize weight-loss benefits by incorporating up to four non-consecutive days a week of resistance-based exercise such as kettlebell, TRX, and weightlifting.

Myth:

Do Cardio First, Then Resistance training
If you’re hitting the treadmill for an intense cardio session and then plan to hit the weights afterward, you’ll have little energy left in your tank for your resistance training. When it comes to doing a full, high-intensity cardio session and an entire resistance training workout, perform each on separate days so that you can give 100% attention on each one of them.

Myth:

You Should Burn at Least 500 Calories During Your Cardio Sessions
Ignore the numbers on the treadmill, cross trainer or cycle console and focus on intensity instead. If you work harder in shorter bursts, you’ll burn more calories even after your workout is over. Use a heart-rate monitor (aim to stay between 65 and 85 percent of your max heart rate) or the rate of perceived exertion scale of 1 to 10 (strive for an 7 or 8 on high-intensity intervals) to determine if you’re working hard enough. Consult a professional before starting fitness regimen.

Myth:

Cardio On an Empty Stomach Burns More Fat
You can’t drive a car without gas, so why expect something different from your body? The trouble with this theory is that the large muscles that power you through your cardio exercise rely heavily on a combination of carbs and fats for energy. When you run or bike on an empty stomach, your body will turn to the carbohydrate and fat fragments in your bloodstream and muscle stores, not to the fat in your fat cells to energize your workout, says Michele Olson, Ph.D., an adjunct professor of sports science at Huntingdon College in Montgomery, AL. This strategy could completely backfire, she adds, as you may become hypoglycaemic (low sugar) and low on hydration, which can cause you to cut back on the intensity or stop the exercise.
Eat something light and easy to digest, such as a small piece of fruit and half a cup of low-fat yogurt sprinkled with a couple tablespoons of granola. And be sure to wash it down with one or two full glasses of water.

Myth:

If You Do Enough Cardio, You Can Eat Whatever You Want
Most of us overestimate how many calories we burn during our workouts; and we underestimate how many calories we’re eating.
Exercise alone just isn’t effective enough to burn fat, a recent study suggests that the average obese person loses approximately 5 pounds of fat over the course of eight months through cardio or resistance training alone. That’s an awful lot of work for very minimal results, so don’t forget the “calories in” side of the equation and follow a healthy diet that delivers the calories you need to eat to lose weight.

Read More
Fact vs Fiction

Fact vs Fiction


Myth

Strength-training exercises like crunches will get rid of abdominal flab.

Fact

Spot training (or reducing) isn’t possible. While crunches are important for firming and strengthening the abdominals, they won’t remove fat from that area. In addition to ab exercises, do a total-body strength workout to boost your overall lean muscle mass, and blast fat and calories with a consistent cardio routine (at least 30 minutes, three to five days a week for weight loss). Don’t forget to follow a healthy diet as well.

Myth

Sit-ups aren’t safe or effective for training your abs.

Fact

“When done in a controlled manner without the use of momentum, a sit-up is simply a trunk curl taken that much further by the use of the hip flexors, and can be a very effective ab-training exercise,” says Wayne Westcott, Ph.D., fitness research director at the South Shore YMCA in Quincy, Mass. So why the bad rap? “People with low-back pain have tight hip flexors and are advised not to do sit-ups because they work the hip flexors a good deal and might exacerbate the issue,” Westcott says. “But really, sit-ups can be done by the majority of the population.”
To safely get the most out of a full sit-up, follow instructions for the basic crunch, moving slowly in both directions, lifting up to an almost-seated position. If your neck aches, lightly cup one hand behind it for support.

Myth

If you want to get a firmer, flatter belly, you need to do ab exercises every day.

Fact

“Although the abs are postural muscles and have a predominance of slow-twitch fibers, which recover quickly from an abundance of work, they are still just like other muscles and need time to rest, recover and rebuild. Train your abs no more than two to four days a week on non-consecutive days.

Myth

You should train your abs at the end of your workout.

Fact

There’s some validity to the claim that training your abs last preserves your core strength for the earlier part of your workout: “If you’re going to do squats or multi-muscle exercises like push-ups or lunges that require a lot of balance, you might want to do abs last so your core is fresh and strong,”. On the other hand, experts generally agree that you should do ab moves when you’re most likely to do them. “The danger of always putting abs at the end is that people run out of time and end up never training them”.

Myth

Because the abs is endurance muscles, you have to do hundreds of reps to get results.

Fact

Abs do have greater endurance than most muscle groups—however, “doing an exercise with proper form, using slow, controlled motions, is an excellent way to maximize results,” says Stuart Rugg, Ph.D., chair of the department of kinesiology at Occidental College in Los Angeles. If you’re using correct form, there should be no reason to exceed two or three sets of 25 reps of any ab exercise you do. “Quality is more important than quantity
Consult a fitness professional before starting any exercise regimen.

Read More
MYTH BUSTER

MYTH BUSTER


The Myth:

No pain, no gain:
This is easily the most popular catch phrase to mislead a world since long time. Especially by old school bodybuilders and athletes.

The truth:

Regardless of the way bodybuilders and athletes train, exercise does not have to hurt you each time you train for other population.

How to minimize/reduce Pain/Soreness:

  • When you first start an exercise program, it’s normal to feel some discomfort for several days after your workouts. Starting at an easy level and slowly progressing to a higher intensity can avert much of this pain.
  • Training too hard can be counterproductive, as it may lead to overtraining. Nicholas DeNubile, M.D., clinical assistant professor in the department of orthopedic surgery at the University of Pennsylvania and orthopedic consultant to the Philadelphia says, “When you over train, your body (muscle fibers) actually breaks down.” And gives soreness.
  • To minimize soreness, warm up (at least 10 minutes) before your workouts and cool down and stretch afterward. You may use foam roller to minimize the soreness.
  • Stay in tune to the signs your body is sending. DeNubile says, “You must learn the difference between slight muscle soreness from a good workout and the soreness that may be a warning sign of an injury.”

Occasional muscle pain, especially if it’s bilateral (on both sides of the body), is normal, but it doesn’t necessarily indicate that you had a good workout. This may suggest that your body is new to this stimulus or intensity and will get use to it in couple of days.

Change the stimulus or intensity slowly and gradually to minimize the soreness/pain.

Bottom line:

“No pain, no gain” only applies to exceptional situations and sometimes in competitive sports. While it is generally true that very hard training is needed in most areas to achieve big training gains, pain should always be avoided. It is important that you listen to your body and not ignore signals like pain. If you give yourself the time you need to recover, you will be able to enjoy working out without pain for a long time to come.

Read More
Apple Cider Vinegar (ACV)

Apple Cider Vinegar (ACV)

A balanced weight and body size yields innumerable health benefits in the long run. Some of these include a regulated blood pressure, good body posture, slow ageing, self esteem and confidence. Plus, a healthy body weight helps keep the risk of dreadful diseases, such as diabetes, blood pressure etc. at bay.
Regular exercise and a healthy diet are mainly the components for achieving and maintaining a balanced body composition (Fat vs Lean mass). But there’s one thing you can add in your greater scheme of things for getting your weight goals, that is, the Apple cider vinegar. Having a pale to medium amber colour, the Apple cider vinegar is a great choice for those who wish to shed those unwanted pounds.
Here are some simple ways using apple cider vinegar for healthy body composition.

1. Drinking ACV before meals

ACV contains almost exactly the same amount of pectin as raw apples. Therefore, when you consume it before having your meals, it shall make you feel fuller and satisfied. That will make you eat considerably less, this aiding in weight loss.

2. As a boost to digestion

ACV is a great digestion stimulant. It helps break-down the food, and also remove toxins from the body. Thus, it helps lose weight in the long run.

3. In utilisation of iron

Another reason that makes ACV an important tool for losing weight is its ability to help the body utilise iron effectively and efficiently.

4. As a source of potassium

Americans vinegar-coated beans not for no reason. Apples are, and therefore, ACV is a great source of potassium. So, by substituting your usage of salt with ACV, you can significantly boost up your weight loss plans.
Important Note: if you don’t have good eating habits then above mentioned things won’t work for you. Consult a Nutritionist for healthy diet regimen.

Read More
Healthy breakfast options

Healthy breakfast options


1. Vegetable Dalia

Due to its dietary fiber and protein content you can call it Hindustani super food.
(100 gram wheat dalia = 79 gram carbs, 11 gram protein, 1 gram fat)

2. Upma

This is made out of Semolina, so people with gluten problem can eat this easily.
(100 gram semolina = 73 gram carbs, 13 gram protein, 1 gram fat)

3. Thepla

Made with whole wheat flour, fenugreek leaves, coriander leaves, turmeric powder have it with bowl of curd which will increase protein content and simultaneously will lower its Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load.

4. Sprout Salad

You can have it as healthy snack or side dish. It has good amount of dietary fiber and proteins.
(100 gram sprout = 6 gram carbs, 3 gram protein, 0.5 gram fats)

5. Poha

Good source of carbohydrates, Protein and Fats just add lemon and peanuts, spread some coconut and have it with curd for good kick start of day.
(30 gram dry poha = 40 gram carbs, 4 gram protein, 1 gram fat)

6. Paneer Burji

fulfilling Protein requirement for Vegetarian is difficult task. Paneer is great choice for this. Make paratha, wrap rolls or use it in salad.
(100 gram paneer = 1.2 gram carbs, 18 gram protein, 21 gram fats)

7. Oats

Oats are rich in Proteins and fibers. You can make masala oat, can put it in milk and nuts to start a healthy day.
(50 gram oats = 33 gram carbs, 9 gram protein, 3.5 gram fats)

8. Multigrain Paratha

you can mix different combinations of attas (wheat/soya/jawar/ragi etc) and put any stuffing from Paneer, vegetables, egg, chicken etc for healthy start of the day.

9. Besan Cheela/ Besan Omlet

Gram flour or Besan is a good source of Protein for vegetarian. You can eat it with Chapati, whole wheat bread etc.
(50 gram besan = 30 gram carbs, 11 gram protein, 3.5 gram fats)

10. Idli Sambar

Good combination of different lentils, idli is good option to start your day. This will give you all macro nutrients, like carbohydrate, protein and fats.
(1 idli = 4 gram carbs, 2 gram protein, 2 gram fats)

Try to add different seeds in the food like Chia seeds, Pumpkin Seeds, Flaxseeds, Hemp Seeds, Sesame Seeds which will give you Omega 3 fatty acid which is anti inflammatory and good for Heart.

Read More
AMRAP (As Many Rounds/Rep as Possible)

AMRAP (As Many Rounds/Rep as Possible)

AMRAP, or “As Many Rounds/Reps as Possible,” is a type of high-intensity interval training that has grown in popularity in recent years—and for good reason. These short, challenging metabolic-conditioning workouts are fast, fun and effective.
The “reps” version of AMRAP involves selecting only one exercise and a time constraint. For example, completing as many push-ups as possible in a five-minute time period. This is a great tool for training and measuring your muscular endurance (and mental fortitude!) over time.
The “rounds” version of AMRAP can make up an entire express workout. Simply select a short series of exercises and a defined number of repetitions for each one. Set a time constraint and perform the complete series of exercises as many times as possible. The Aim is Intensity.

The Benefits

Fun

You will enjoy the challenge and the ability to pace, and can be done in a group, the competition and camaraderie of exercising with other participants.

Scalability

Any exercise can be selected based on your ability level and he or she has complete control over the pace of the workout. AMRAP is also great in a group format because every person in the group can move at his or her own pace, yet still be motivated and challenged by the speed of others.

Measurement

Completing the same AMRAP workout again over time is a great tool for measuring progress in developing in muscular endurance and cardiovascular capacity.

PERFECT FOR ATHLETES OF ALL LEVELS

No matter if you are a total beginner or an elite athlete, this format will be challenging. If you need to do band-assisted Pull Ups, or Press Ups on your knees instead, then do that. AMRAPS can be easily scaled to suit all abilities, the right attitude to give it all you have is the most important thing!

Most AMRAPS tend to be between 5 – 30 minutes long, but there are many exceptions.

This kind of workout is very intense and time efficient. It’s individually challenging due to the possibility to create a personal plan for every skill level. You can integrate all kind of exercises and it presents a perfect mixture of strength and endurance training.

AMRAPS ARE A GREAT WAY TO

• Burn fat
• Test your mental toughness
• Improve your technique under pressure and fatigue
• Build strength and conditioning
• Increase your capacity for working well at a high heart rate
• Testing your physical limits

A Word of Caution

As a health and fitness professional, AMRAP workouts are some of the hardest to coach. Encourage yourself to “push your limits,” even ensure to maintain proper form throughout. It is essential to pay close attention to form and movement mechanics, especially toward end of the workout (when fatigue can cause form to suffer), and know when to pull back on the reins.

The Workout

The following AMRAP workout is a great combination of strength and power movements, spanning across the entire foundational movement spectrum.
Ensure your clients are properly warmed up before they dive into this challenging workout.
15 Minutes: As Many Rounds as Possible
15 Push Ups
20 Air Squat
10 Pull ups
20 Crunches

Read More
THE EFFECTS OF EXERCISE ON PSYCHOLOGICAL WELLBEING

THE EFFECTS OF EXERCISE ON PSYCHOLOGICAL WELLBEING


COGNITION

Exercise has been shown to have a number of positive effects on a person’s cognitive functioning

MOOD

Exercise is related to positive changes in mood and has been found to improve positive mood regardless of the number of negative and positive affects experienced in a given day

ATTITUDE

Exercise helps to improve your body image and therefore improves your attitude

DEPRESSION

Exercising three to five times per week produces significant reductions in depression compared to once a week

ANXIETY

There are a number of acute affects associated with exercising such as lower state anxiety and higher tranquillity scores

GROWTH

Exercise provides you with new challenges which make you feel as though you have an aim in life

SELF ACCEPTANCE

 Exercising may help to give you more positive view about yourself

FRIENDSHIP

Exercising in group or with partner may lead to more social interactions which can in turn relate to positive relations with others

MASTERY

By exercising you may develope environmental mastery which makes you feel you are in charge of the situations in which you live
Following are the recommendations from American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM)and Centre for Disease Control and Prevention(CDC)

Cardio-respiratory exercises

– at least 3 or more days for 30 minutes or more with moderate intensity
(For example Walking, Jogging, Cycling, Swimming etc)

Resistance Training

– moderate to high-intensity 8 to 12 repetition 2 or more days a week
(For example Strength machines, Dumbell, Resistance Tubes etc)

Balance Activity

– 3 or more days a week
(For example Yoga, Tai Chi, Pilates)

Flexibility

Preferably daily after finishing all exercises e.g. Cardio-respiratory, Resistance training, Balance etc
(For example static stretches hold for at least 15 seconds each)

Read More
X